Eero Mesh Wifi Review: A Pretty Good Mesh System

Eero Mesh Wifi Review: A Pretty Good Mesh System

The company Eero, although you wouldn’t immediately know it from the branding is owned by Amazon.

But, please bear in mind you only get you a single Eero node, which functions as a standalone router. If you want to make use of the Eero’s mesh capabilities you’ll need to buy multiple units, or perhaps buy a three-pack for £249. Aside from it being an Amazon owned product is it any good compared to the competition?

Amazon Prime members can save 20% on an Eero Mesh Wi-Fi system, which promises to extend the reach of your home Wi-Fi, covering up to 460 sq.m. and eliminating annoying dropped connections when you need online access the most. It's easy to set up and use, this discount will be only be available for a limited time.

The Eero Mesh Wifi is a dual-band 802.11ac mesh extender system. Like most such systems, it’s designed to replace your existing router but if that’s not an option you can use it in bridge mode to extend your wireless network. It’s configured through a smartphone app which includes guest network and parental control options.


Introducing Amazon eero mesh Wi-Fi router/extender
£99.00amazon uk

The Eero Mesh Hardware

The Eero is small, neat and unobtrusive, with a rounded, slightly wedge-shaped design. It has one LED, beneath the top cover, shines and pulses softly in various colours to show the status of the unit; and that's it apart from a reset button set into the base. At the rear there’s a USB Type-C socket for power and and two Gigabit Ethernet connectors.

The compactness and simplicity of Eero units has its appeal, but more Ethernet ports would be preferred, especially since one of the sockets on the primary unit will be taken up by the connection to your modem. You may find you that you will need a standalone switch too, which rather defeats the neatness appeal of the Eero.

Setup and features

Eero comes with an app for both Android and iOS, which handles setup and all administration tasks.

The Android app which I used for this review detected my Eero units easily, gave me some general advice about positioning them, checked the strength of the connection and automatically installed the latest firmware. The main app screen, shows an overview of your nodes and connected devices, along with the results of your most recent internet speed test. There’s no WPS support, but you can generate a QR code that compatible clients can scan to instantly connect to the network. (WPS is not really advised to choose by default as it is not the most secure option).

You can tap to see more details of any device and optionally assign a “family profile” to apply parental controls. This feature is not exactly comprehensive, but you can set a weekly schedule to suspend internet access for devices in a particular group. The limitations of the device mean that you cannot limit usage or block access to undesirable websites.

Guest network settings are also quite basic. You can turn the guest network on and off, give it its own name and password and generate a quick-connect QR code, but you can’t set up multiple networks, or grant access from the guest network to specific resources.

A very handy features of the Eero is the ability to activate a pop-up notification whenever a new device joins your network – a simple but smart way to spot hackers and freeloaders that you will in the Network Settings page.

Strangely, there are no wireless options. The app gives you no visibility into, nor control over, which channels your Eero system is using. It also doesn't offer separate 2.4GHz and 5GHz SSIDs; you can enable band steering, which tries to move 5GHz-compatible clients on the 5GHz band, but this option is filed under a tab called “Labs” and labelled with the word “BETA”, which doesn't inspire confidence about its reliability. I would imagine an upgrade option will be offered when it is out of beta.

Naturally, Alexa comes with this Amazon owned product, but again it is limited; all you can do is suspend internet access for family groups, turn the device LEDs on and off, and find out which node a particular device is connected to.

See full review at smallmediumbusiness.co.uk reviews

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